Eindhoven University of Technology: KNAW acknowledges innovative research by TU/e researcher with Early Career Award

TU/e researcher Alberto Ravagnani has been awarded the KNAW Early Career Award. The prize, which consists of a sum 15,000 euros and an artwork, is intended to support and encourage young researchers who are capable of developing innovative and original research ideas. It is the third time this year that the young researcher has been singled out for a scientific award or grant.

Alberto Ravagnani is an assistant professor at the department of Mathematics and Computer Science. He is an expert in coding theory, the study of error-correcting codes. Coding theory adds redundancy to make the transmission of data more robust to noise. It is used for instance in compact discs (to correct errors due to scratches and dust), cell phones (to correct for the fading and noise of high frequency radio transmission) and even in the NASA Deep Space Network.

COMBINATORICS AND ALGEBRA
The main challenge in coding theory is to increase the correction capability of a code without lowering the transmission rate. Ravagnani’s research focuses on the connection between problems in coding theory and fundamental questions in combinatorics and algebra. For example, he studies how graph theory and combinatorial geometry can be used to establish the existence of codes with good error correction properties.

Alberto Ravagnani
It is the third time this year that the young researcher has been singled out for a scientific award. In July, the Dutch Research Council (NWO) acknowledged his innovative research with a Vidi research grant. In April, he was one of the winners of a NWO KLEIN award in the domain science.

Ravagnani obtained his PhD in mathematics in 2016 from the University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland. After postdoc experiences in Canada and Ireland, he joined TU/e in 2020, where he is part of the Coding Theory and Cryptology group.

EARLY CAREER AWARD
The KNAW Early Career Award has been granted since 2019 and is intended to support and encourage young scientists within seven years of receiving their PhD. The award is aimed at early-career researchers who have done excellent scientific work and are capable of developing innovative and original research ideas. Additional merits in the fields of valorization, outreach, and stimulating other young reseachers, are also taken into consideration.

Each year a maximum of twelve awards are presented, divided among the following domains: humanities, behavioral, social and legal sciences; natural and technical sciences; and medical, medical-biological and health sciences. More information on this year’s winners can be found on the website of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

The KNAW Early Career Award consists of a sum of 15,000 euros and an artwork by Laura Klinkenberg. The money may be spent at the discretion of the winners on their own research careers.

Comments are closed.