Harper Adams University: Farmers and agronomists’ opinions sought over potential glyphosate ban

The impact of a potential ban of glyphosate on UK agriculture is being examined by a Harper Adams University student.

Charles Twinberrow, a final year BSc (Hons) Agriculture student, is asking both farmers and agronomists to share their views on how such a ban would affect them for his Honours Research Project.

He said: “A potential ban on glyphosate may be coming by the end of 2025 and I feel the industry is woefully unprepared, with very few alternatives being tested and lack of options if it were to be removed.

“I also feel by carrying out this investigation that I will be able gain a greater perspective on farming without a reliance on glyphosate, even if it is not banned.

“This is knowledge I will able to use in the future when making decisions on-farm.”

Interested farmers and agronomists can make their views known by completing Charles’ survey, which can be found online here until the end of the month.

Charles, who says he ‘grew up driving tractors and handling livestock’ is from a 400-acre mixed organic family farm in Worcestershire.

However, he had not originally intended to head to university – or to pursue education any further than he had to.

However, a series of farm placements and his commitment to hard work meant that – despite his initial reluctance – Charles began to follow a path which would lead him to Harper Adams, with a view to developing a new career in agriculture.

He said: “School was never something I looked forward to. I was always wanting to be back out on the family farm.”

“Nevertheless, I took the view I had to be there, so I would make the best of it.

“I worked hard to ‘manage’ my dyslexia, and after receiving GCSE results far surpassing what I was told to expect when entering high school, I decided to go to agricultural college and study Farm Mechanisation.

“Whilst there I enjoyed a brilliant industry placement at a local contract farming enterprise, opening my mind to a whole world of large-scale farming.

“After once again surpassing all expectations and leaving with a triple distinction star grade, I thought that this would be as far as my education would go – so I decided to spend a year working away from the family farm in Lincolnshire.

“This, once again, opened my mind, and sowed the seeds of my aspirations to become a farm manger one day.”

As he began to realise the breadth of his ambitions, Charles looked around for Higher Education options – and found his place at Harper Adams University.

He added: “As a farm manager, it was clear I would benefit from having a university degree behind me.

“Naturally, there is no better degree for a farm manger than one obtained at Harper Adams, so that august I applied last-minute, to enrol later the following month.

“I have enjoyed every minute here at Harper and look forward to the future and where my degree can hopefully take me.”

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