Mary Kay Inc. Supports Female Entrepreneur-Led Project to Improve Water Security in Monterrey in Partnership With The Nature Conservancy

Monterrey: Mary Kay Inc. is proud to announce the sponsorship of a project to improve water security in Monterrey in partnership with The Nature Conservancy. The project, led by a group of female entrepreneurs, focuses on restoring local species of trees in the surrounding areas of the city of Monterrey to help maintain ecosystem services, decrease the risk and impact of floods in the city, and restore the degraded forests in the region.

The City of Monterrey is currently home to four million people. Located in an area naturally prone to extreme hydrometeorological events such as hurricanes and flooding, the city often faces serious water supply challenges. Near the city is the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park, a protected natural reserve that accounts for about 60% of the water that comes to the city. The area also supports the control of heavy stormwater runoff which impacts people, local livestock, and urban infrastructure. To maintain environmental resiliency, vegetation cover needs to be restored and the production of native plants in nurseries must be ensured. While the National Commission of Protected Natural Areas of Mexico (CONANP) has established regulations requiring the use of native species for reforestation, forest nurseries in the region do not have the capacity to meet this demand. The area also offers very few opportunities for local farmers to develop self-sustaining economic activities.

 

“We are very happy to be able to count on this help that encourages us to continue working for the benefit of nature and to be able to generate resources that improve our local economy,” said Doña Angelica, leader of Mujeres Unidas Para La Conservación de Laguna de Sanchez, one of The Nature Conservancy’s partner organizations in Mexico. “With this help we will be able to reduce the production costs of plants that will be used in future reforestations.”

 

Mary Kay and The Nature Conservancy are supporting a group of female entrepreneurs in the Laguna Sanchez community who are leading a unique initiative to combat these challenges. This group of landowners is producing several native species of plants to be used for reforestation projects in the national park. The project will not only address the rising need for these species, but also improve livelihoods for their families and rural community members. Their forest nursery has the capacity to grow around 45,000 trees per year, including white pine (Pinus pseudostrobus) and stone pine (Pinus cembroides). These species, included in a scientific tool developed by The Nature Conservancy for ecological restoration in the area, are known for preventing erosion, promoting water infiltration, drought tolerance, and have the ability to regrow.

 

“Empowering women and preserving the Earth’s resources are two of the pillars of Mary Kay’s purpose,” said Deborah Gibbins, Chief Operating Officer at Mary Kay Inc. “As an advocate for women’s leadership, we are very proud to see how these local leaders are steering the change in our community, playing a critical role in the preservation of our most valuable natural resource and nurturing a sustainable future for thousands of families in the region.”

 

To help tell the story of empowerment and natural conservation of Angelica and Mujeres Unidas Para La Conservación de Laguna de Sanchez, Mary Kay Inc. has produced a short film in partnership with The Nature Conservancy. Written, directed and produced by an all-female team, Forest of Hope is a journey to the frontlines of the battle to save our planet from the impending threats of climate change and destructive human behavior, where we see the difference a group of women conservationists can make. Watch the trailer of Forest of Hope here.

 

 

 

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