Monash University supporting students affected by the bushfire crisis

The Bushfire Crisis Student Grants will support new commencing and ongoing students with immediate aid of up to $2,000 each, to help cover basic practical education requirements such as IT equipment and books.

It is estimated up to 1,000 Monash students have been impacted by the Australian bushfires.

Professor Susan Elliott AM, Deputy Vice Chancellor and Vice President (Education), said the bushfire crisis had hit many people hard, and the Monash community had not been isolated from the impacts of the disaster.

“Many students and staff have been affected, either as residents, holidaymakers, evacuees, or having family members in these fire-stricken areas. We know for some, the impacts will be felt for many months and years to come,” she said.

“Monash is doing all we can to support these people through practical and emotional assistance. In response to this disaster, and acknowledgement of the difficulties some students will face returning to or beginning study this year, we’re launching a new grant for students who have been affected by the bushfires.”

Professor Elliott said students experiencing longer-term issues as a result of the bushfires may also be eligible for other grants to support them.

The University is also supporting students through free counselling and peer mentoring services.

“The health and wellbeing of our staff and students is our greatest priority,” she said.

“We are pleased to be able to support our students experiencing this tragedy through this new grant scheme, and will continue to provide support to the Monash community throughout this crisis.”

Monash University is also supporting the bushfire response by providing practical assistance to the bushfire areas, including the use of its drone fleet and airborne sensors to create high-resolution colour imagery to map assets and asset loss.

Monash is also providing its broad expertise to the Federal and Victorian governments, including rebuilding communities, climate science and the long-term impact on volunteers and those affected by the disaster.

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