RMIT: RMIT recognised as top employer for gender equality

RMIT has received the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA) Employer of Choice for Gender Equality (EOCGE) citation for the fifth consecutive year.

The citation encourages, recognises and promotes an active commitment to achieving gender equality in Australian workplaces, and acknowledges RMIT’s continued progress across the primary Employer of Choice Gender Equality categories, including developing a gender-balanced workforce, pay equity, support for parents and carers, mainstreaming flexibility and preventing gender-based harassment.

RMIT is among 120 Australian employers, including 12 new companies, who were awarded the prestigious WGEA certification on Wednesday, to certify they are driving progress to make their workplaces equal.

RMIT Vice-Chancellor Professor Alec Cameron said receiving the certification for the fifth consecutive year reflects RMIT’s ongoing commitment to removing barriers to women’s inclusion and progression at the University.

“RMIT has a core commitment to equality. We embrace the diversity of our staff and students, and we are determined to ensure our people are not held back by prejudice of any type,” Professor Cameron said.

“Our future success will be dependent on attracting and retaining the best people and providing the opportunity for all our staff and students to fulfil their potential. 

“To achieve this, we must be unrelenting in our expectation of gender equality and our pursuit of respect and fairness for all,” he said.

RMIT’s Interim Chief People Officer Gaynor Witts said “this recognition really highlights the amazing work we are doing to create an inclusive community for all our people.”

WGEA Director, Mary Wooldridge said that Employer of Choice for Gender Equality citation holders are officially recognised as some of the best employers in Australia who are committed and dedicated to action in achieving gender equality.

“Critically, these organisations are delivering on a formula that sees better support structures in place for working families; stronger actions to address pay inequalities; and strategic recruitment and promotion practices that help to encourage the full participation of women at work.”

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