Te Apārangi leadership role for Auckland’s Pro Vice-Chancellor Māori

Professor Kiro has been in the PVC role since 2018, and remains a Professor in the Faculty of Education and Social Work where she was Te Tumu (Deputy Dean), Director of Starpath and Director for Tai Tokerau Campus. She has taken a leave of absence from the University.

Vice-Chancellor Professor Dawn Freshwater said that the appointment was well deserved.

“The CEO role at the Society is a highly prestigious position and the appointment underlines the high regard Professor Kiro is held in nationally and internationally, and the contribution she has made to research in Aotearoa.

“This is a testimony to Cindy’s leadership, national presence and ability. I am particularly delighted that she intends to maintain a connection with the University and to know that when her tenure there ends, she has left the door open here.”

Among a host of other achievements, most recently Professor Kiro has driven the implementation of Te Reo across the University, including the Te Reo Revitalisation Plan, Te Kūaha App, Kuputaka and a three-five year plan to increase staff use of te reo. She also developed an Iwi Māori relationships strategy, consulting particularly with iwi across Tāmaki-makau-rau and Te Tai Tokerau.

She is Deputy Director Engagement for the Centre for Societal Resilience Te Toka Rinohea and has been a Researcher and Board member of Ngā Pae ō te Māramatanga Centre of Research Excellence.

Professor Kiro said that she is heartened by the developments at the University of Auckland, particularly in regard to Te Aō Māori – including the implementation of the Te Reo policy. She is confident that the University’s new strategy, currently being developed, will continue to prioritise this.

“I am sad to be leaving the University of Auckland and the incredible knowledge, skills and wisdom that I have experienced here. I will miss the people who have enriched the places where I worked.”

“But I am excited to take a wider leadership role in providing staged, considered advice about science, research, mātauranga and rangahau. Knowledge informed decision-making should be at the heart of government and society.”

The organisation now known as The Royal Society of New Zealand Te Apārangi dates back to 1867, established via an Act of Parliament for the study of science, art, philosophy and literature. Today its purpose is to support New Zealanders to explore, discover and share knowledge through public outreach, education, and by supporting the research community. It provides advice and information to government and the public; celebrates researchers at the top of their fields with medals, awards and prizes; and provide standards of ethics and professional behaviour as well as making transparent, effective decisions about research funding and learning opportunities.

Professor Kiro takes up the position as Chief Executive on 1 March 2021. The University will be going out shortly with an internal Expression of Interest process to appoint a new Pro Vice-Chancellor, Māori.

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