Technical University of Denmark: Research building for new sustainable climate solutions

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DTU is now constructing a Climate Challenge Laboratory to help create the sustainable energy technologies of the future. On Wednesday, 31 August, the construction will be marked with a stone laying and walling ceremony.

When the Climate Challenge Laboratory opens in 2024, the building will house national research infrastructures and several research groups working together to solve some of our biggest climate challenges.

The goal is to form new national and international collaborations across disciplines and thus accelerate the development of the necessary solutions needed to create a sustainable future for us humans and our planet, says Rasmus Larsen, DTU’s Executive Vice President, Provost:

“With the Climate Challenge Laboratory, DTU can accommodate a significant research effort in new materials for Power-to-X technologies. There is a great need for new efficient, durable, and globally scalable materials for sustainable processes that can harvest, convert, and store electrical energy from renewable sources.”

Sustainability is front and centre
In the new Climate Challenge Laboratory it will be possible to carry out both experimental research work in laboratories and theoretical research work. Here, physicists, chemists, energy engineers, and biologists will work with researchers from other disciplines as well as students, companies, and other universities.

Among the new residents is a research centre working to develop sustainable catalysts that can make the production of renewable energy much more efficient. The centre is headed by professor Jens Kehlet Nørskov, one of the world’s leading catalysis researchers.

You will also find a basic research centre, where researchers can use a new world-class electron microscope to visualize catalytic materials and processes that take place at the atomic level in 3D—as well as a national unit that researches new functional energy materials for energy conversion and storage.

Sustainability is also at the centre of DTU’s development and construction of the Climate Challenge Laboratory itself. Like all new buildings at DTU, the building is certified according to the international standard for sustainable construction, the DGNB Gold.DTU is now constructing a Climate Challenge Laboratory to help create the sustainable energy technologies of the future. On Wednesday, 31 August, the construction will be marked with a stone laying and walling ceremony.

When the Climate Challenge Laboratory opens in 2024, the building will house national research infrastructures and several research groups working together to solve some of our biggest climate challenges.

The goal is to form new national and international collaborations across disciplines and thus accelerate the development of the necessary solutions needed to create a sustainable future for us humans and our planet, says Rasmus Larsen, DTU’s Executive Vice President, Provost:

“With the Climate Challenge Laboratory, DTU can accommodate a significant research effort in new materials for Power-to-X technologies. There is a great need for new efficient, durable, and globally scalable materials for sustainable processes that can harvest, convert, and store electrical energy from renewable sources.”

Sustainability is front and centre
In the new Climate Challenge Laboratory it will be possible to carry out both experimental research work in laboratories and theoretical research work. Here, physicists, chemists, energy engineers, and biologists will work with researchers from other disciplines as well as students, companies, and other universities.

Among the new residents is a research centre working to develop sustainable catalysts that can make the production of renewable energy much more efficient. The centre is headed by professor Jens Kehlet Nørskov, one of the world’s leading catalysis researchers.

You will also find a basic research centre, where researchers can use a new world-class electron microscope to visualize catalytic materials and processes that take place at the atomic level in 3D—as well as a national unit that researches new functional energy materials for energy conversion and storage.

Sustainability is also at the centre of DTU’s development and construction of the Climate Challenge Laboratory itself. Like all new buildings at DTU, the building is certified according to the international standard for sustainable construction, the DGNB Gold.DTU is now constructing a Climate Challenge Laboratory to help create the sustainable energy technologies of the future. On Wednesday, 31 August, the construction will be marked with a stone laying and walling ceremony.

When the Climate Challenge Laboratory opens in 2024, the building will house national research infrastructures and several research groups working together to solve some of our biggest climate challenges.

The goal is to form new national and international collaborations across disciplines and thus accelerate the development of the necessary solutions needed to create a sustainable future for us humans and our planet, says Rasmus Larsen, DTU’s Executive Vice President, Provost:

“With the Climate Challenge Laboratory, DTU can accommodate a significant research effort in new materials for Power-to-X technologies. There is a great need for new efficient, durable, and globally scalable materials for sustainable processes that can harvest, convert, and store electrical energy from renewable sources.”

Sustainability is front and centre
In the new Climate Challenge Laboratory it will be possible to carry out both experimental research work in laboratories and theoretical research work. Here, physicists, chemists, energy engineers, and biologists will work with researchers from other disciplines as well as students, companies, and other universities.

Among the new residents is a research centre working to develop sustainable catalysts that can make the production of renewable energy much more efficient. The centre is headed by professor Jens Kehlet Nørskov, one of the world’s leading catalysis researchers.

You will also find a basic research centre, where researchers can use a new world-class electron microscope to visualize catalytic materials and processes that take place at the atomic level in 3D—as well as a national unit that researches new functional energy materials for energy conversion and storage.

Sustainability is also at the centre of DTU’s development and construction of the Climate Challenge Laboratory itself. Like all new buildings at DTU, the building is certified according to the international standard for sustainable construction, the DGNB Gold.

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