Texas A&M: Hagler Institute for Advanced Study Announces 10th Class of Fellows

The Hagler Institute for Advanced Study at Texas A&M University announced eight Hagler Fellows for its Class of 2021-22, including a recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics.

This 10th class in the Hagler Institute’s history includes scientists, engineers and scholars who are recognized internationally for their achievements. Each belongs to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, or hold recognitions of equal stature in their fields.

“Every year for the last decade, the Hagler Institute has enhanced the Texas A&M research community through its exceptional ability to consistently attract the world’s brightest minds to our campus,” Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp said. “Combined with the Chancellor’s Research Initiative, the Hagler Institute also persuades many of these National Academy-level researchers to join our own illustrious and permanent faculty.”

The fellows will collaborate with faculty, researchers and students in the colleges of agriculture and life sciences, engineering, medicine and science; Texas A&M AgriLife Research; and the Institute for Quantum Science and Engineering.

“Congratulations to the Hagler Institute for recruiting an outstanding new class of fellows for its 10th anniversary,” Texas A&M Interim Vice President for Research Jack Baldauf said. “We look forward to the collaboration of these renowned scholars with our own outstanding faculty members, researchers and students.”

The institute selects its Hagler Fellows from among top scholars who have distinguished themselves through outstanding professional accomplishments or significant recognition. Previous classes of Hagler Fellows have included two Nobel laureates, a Wolf Prize recipient, a recipient of the Hubble Medal in Literature for Lifetime Achievement, a recipient of the National Medal of Science, an awardee of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, a two-time recipient of the State Prize of Russia and a recipient of both the National Humanities Medal and the Johan Skytte Prize, the most prestigious award in political science.

“We expect this remarkable 10th class of Hagler Fellows to have a productive and enduring impact on our faculty, our students and on the culture of the Texas A&M campus,” Founding Director John L. Junkins of the Hagler Institute said. “Since 2012, the Hagler Institute has now attracted 88 outstanding scientists, engineers and scholars to enhance our research community.”

The Hagler Institute plans to induct the following Class of 2021-22 Hagler Fellows during its annual gala in early 2022:

Kevin G. Bowcutt, Principal Senior Technical Fellow and chief scientist of hypersonics, Boeing Research and Technology – Bowcutt is an internationally recognized expert in hypersonic aerodynamics, propulsion integration and vehicle design and optimization. He is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Bowcutt will collaborate with faculty and students in the College of Engineering.
Jacqueline H. Chen, senior scientist, Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories – Chen is a pioneer in the application of advanced computational methods to understand combustion and chemical reactions relevant to engines. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Chen will collaborate with faculty and students in the College of Engineering.
Jennifer H. Elisseeff, Jules Stein Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University – Elisseeff specializes in engineered biomaterials that can replace, repair or regenerate human tissues. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Medicine. Elisseeff will collaborate with faculty and students in the colleges of engineering and medicine.
Theodore Goodson III, Richard Barry Bernstein Collegiate Professor of Chemistry and Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan – Goodson investigates nonlinear optical and energy transfer in organic multi-chromophore systems for particular optical and electronic applications. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Goodson will collaborate with faculty and students in the College of Science.
Arthur M. Jaffe, Landon T. Clay Professor of Mathematics and Theoretical Science, Department of Physics, Harvard University – Jaffe’s major work has been in the realm of understanding quantum theory and the mathematics that it inspires. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Jaffe will collaborate with faculty and students in the College of Science.
Nancy R. Sottos, department head and holder, Maybelle Leland Swanlund Endowed Chair, The Grainger College of Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign – Sottos develops polymers and composites capable of self-healing and regeneration, self-reporting and self-protection to improve reliability. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Sottos will collaborate with faculty and students in the College of Engineering.
Donna T. Strickland, professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada – Strickland was awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics for developing chirped pulse amplification, used in corrective eye surgery, industrial machining and medical imaging. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. Strickland will collaborate with faculty and students in the Institute for Quantum Science and Engineering, and the colleges of science and agriculture and life sciences.
Nikolay I. Zheludev, professor and deputy director of the Zepler Institute, University of Southampton, U.K. – Zheludev is a founding member of the closely interlinked fields of metamaterials and nanophotonics. He is a fellow of the Royal Society and an international member of the National Academy of Engineering. Zheludev will collaborate with faculty and students in the colleges of science and engineering, and Texas A&M AgriLife Research.
About the Hagler Institute for Advanced Study: The Hagler Institute for Advanced Study was established in December 2010 by The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents to build on the growing academic reputation of Texas A&M and to provide a framework to attract top scholars from throughout the nation and abroad for appointments of up to a year. The selection of Hagler Fellows initiates with faculty nominations of National Academies and Nobel Prize-caliber scholars who align with existing strengths and ambitions of the University.

About Research at Texas A&M University: As one of the world’s leading research institutions, Texas A&M is at the forefront in making significant contributions to scholarship and discovery, including science and technology. Research conducted at Texas A&M generated annual expenditures of more than $1.131 billion in fiscal year 2020. Texas A&M ranked in the top 25 of the most recent National Science Foundation Higher Education Research and Development survey based on expenditures of more than $952 million in fiscal year 2019. Texas A&M’s research creates new knowledge that provides basic, fundamental, and applied contributions resulting in economic benefits to the state, nation, and world. research.tamu.edu

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