University of Exeter: Have your say about lockdown learning in major new survey of Exeter families and teachers


Have your say about lockdown learning in major new survey of Exeter families and teachers
Parents, children and teachers in Exeter are being asked to share their experiences of lockdown learning as part of a new survey.

Experts hope the research will help them develop new support for pupils in the city this summer to help their wellbeing and education.

The study, led by Professor Justin Dillon from the University of Exeter’s Graduate School of Education, will shed light on the impact of coronavirus lockdowns and changes to schooling over the last year on Exeter children, their parents and teachers in the EX1-4 postcodes.

The anonymous survey is open until May 5 to parents, guardians and carers, young people up to the age of Year 13 and teachers. It takes ten minutes to complete and asks how confident teachers, parents and children have felt about online learning in the past year, what would help young people best over the summer holidays, and what support would best help them catch up with their learning.

Professor Dillon said: “The last year has been a time of great change for everyone, and young people, their families and their teachers have had to adapt to a very different way of working. We want to hear about their experiences, and we hope the results will help us develop effective support this summer. By listening we can begin to think about what can help to give children a better future.”

Teachers can give details of how they have dealt with changes to their work, their feelings about changes they have had to make since March 2020, and how confident they feel about the online education of their pupils since then. The survey also asks about provisions made for young people with special educational needs, and how many pupils they estimate were not in classes online when schools were closed. Teachers can also give details of how they managed the return of children to the classrooms.

Pupils can give details about their working environment at home, how much they feel they’ve learned, how supported they have felt by their school or college, and how changes to their learning have affected their lives. They are asked to rate how they feel now generally compared to a year ago.

Parents are asked about the impact of school closures on their children, if they are concerned about their learning, how schools have met the needs of their son or daughter, and what support has helped best. They can also discuss the impact of online learning on family life, and their children’s wellbeing and health.

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