University of Glasgow: Funding Boost A Expertise Level Up Places Around The UK

The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), part of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) has today announced an £850,000 investment in nine projects across different parts of the UK to support cultural regeneration and boost regional economies.

From building capacity for the creative industries in Merthyr Tydfil to restoring civic pride in our towns, these projects will support cultural and social regeneration across the length and breadth of the UK.

Each of the grants awarded as part of the investment brings together arts and humanities research a expertise with local policy makers to design initiatives that develop the cultural landscape for the benefit of local people and places.

These initiatives are running throughout the year and will achieve a range of goals including redeveloping iconic local landmarks, increasing cultural participation within communities, and tackling socioeconomic inequalities.

The investment forms part of the AHRC Place Programme which is led by Professor Rebecca Madgin at the University of Glasgow and uses arts and humanities research to inform policy decisions and help enrich lives in every part of the UK.

Professor Rebecca Madgin, Arts and Humanities Research Council Programme Director who is based at the University of Glasgow’s School of Social and Political Sciences, said:



“Bringing together arts and humanities researchers and policy makers is essential to ensure decision making at every level takes into account the full breadth of our lived and felt experiences.

“The initiatives funded as part of this investment will benefit places across the UK by bringing people into important decisions about local culture, heritage, and infrastructure.

“AHRC is proud to support projects which will deliver real benefits to local communities and their places across the UK.”

The announcement comes in the same month as the Government’s latest white paper on levelling up and will help to support the vision laid out in the paper of more resilient and prosperous parts of the UK.

Professor Christopher Smith, AHRC Executive Chair, said: “This is a core part of AHRC’s continuing and growing commitment to research and innovation across the United Kingdom, showing how arts and humanities can support flourishing individuals and communities, create economic and social opportunity, and inform policy and decision making.”

Local governments and councils will play a key role in feeding into each initiative, ensuring that the work of the researchers involved, and the contributions made by local people, inform future cultural strategies and important place-based decision making.

A list of the funded projects can be view on the AHRC news pages by clicking on the following link – Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) – UKRI



Comments are closed.