University of Sydney: Medical researchers awarded over $11 million in funding

Projects to improve chronic musculoskeletal conditions in children and adolescents, improving care in emergency departments and a novel model of care for low back pain are among those receiving federal funding.
Five University of Sydney researchers have been awarded a total of over $11 million in the latest rounds of the Australian Government’s Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF) grants.

The MRFF aims to transform health and medical research and innovation to improve lives, build the economy and contribute to health system sustainability.

Interim Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Kathy Belov congratulated the grant recipients on their success.

“Congratulations to our successful grant recipients – Lyn, Natasha, Steve, Kate, and Chris.”

“Your success acknowledges your hard work and dedication to improving the lives of people globally and recognises the quality of the research being conducted at the University of Sydney.”

Professor Kate Curtis
Professor Kate Curtis

Professor Kate Curtis from the Faculty of Medicine and Health was awarded $2.8 million for Giving patients an EPIC-START: An evidence based, data driven model of care to improve patient care and efficiency in emergency departments. The study will address emergency department overcrowding to improve patient outcomes, by studying an innovative model of care to enable earlier decisions, delivery of care and detection of clinical deterioration by frontline emergency department clinicians.

Professor Chris Maher
Professor Chris Maher

Professor Chris Maher from the Faculty of Medicine and Health, and co-Director of Sydney Musculoskeletal Health was awarded $2.8 million for Reshaping the management of low back pain in emergency departments which will reduce the pressure on emergency departments by implementing a novel virtual hospital model of care for low back pain and reshaping. This will provide timely access to dedicated physiotherapists to triage patients and manage non-serious or non-urgent low back pain conditions.

Professor Natasha Nassar
Professor Natasha Nassar

Professor Natasha Nassar from the Faculty of Medicine and Health and Charles Perkins Centre was awarded $1.59 million for JIA KidsLink: Joint Venture to improve surveillance, clinical pathways and health outcomes of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The project will establish a national data linkage surveillance system of health service data, conduct clinical audit and consumer engagement, and identify costs of juvenile idiopathic arthritis to provide national ongoing data to improve early diagnosis, clinical pathways and health and wellbeing of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Professor Lyn March
Professor Lyn March

Professor Lyn March from the Faculty of Medicine and Health and the Kolling Institute was awarded $2.49 million for A3BC for Kids which aims to improve health outcomes for children and adolescents living with juvenile arthritis by collecting biological, environmental and health information from children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis across Australia. The study will research the best treatment pathways for maximising symptom relief, disease control and quality of life, while minimising side effects, risks of ongoing medication exposure and costs.

Professor Steven Kamper
Professor Steven Kamper

Professor Steven Kamper from the Faculty of Medicine and Health was awarded $1.2 million for Pain Smart: Integrating education and clinical care for adolescents with pain to test a health education intervention program delivered alongside a managed care approach for adolescents who experience chronic musculoskeletal pain.

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