UWA scientists named among Australia’s superstars of STEM

A biotechnologist from The University of Western Australia who maps genomes of threatened animals to support Australian biodiversity and conservation has been named a superstar of STEM by Science & Technology Australia.

Associate Professor Parwinder Kaur, from UWA’s School of Agriculture and Environment, who leads DNA Zoo Australia, which aims to save endangered species by understanding their DNA , said she was humbled to be recognised among 60 brilliant women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

She joins two other UWA researchers named as national superstars – Dr Jessica Buck, from UWA’s Centre for Child Health Research and Telethon Kids Institute, and Dr Sabine Bellstedt, from the UWA node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR).

“Emotional intelligence comes quite naturally to females and it’s becoming more and more important as we head towards the next technological revolution.”

Associate Professor Parwinder Kaur
Associate Professor Kaur believes female scientists bring an interesting and different perspective to science.

“Emotional intelligence comes quite naturally to females and it’s becoming more and more important as we head towards the next technological revolution,” Associate Professor Kaur said.

“As per the 2018-19 stats available from year 9 and 10 students, only 50 per cent of girls consider a career in STEM disciplines, compared to 87 per cent of boys.

“We need to eliminate this difference, which is why it’s incredibly important to encourage more young women to pursue a career in STEM fields.”

Science & Technology Australia Chief Executive Officer Misha Schubert said the program gave women in STEM stronger skills and confidence to step into expert commentary roles in the media.

“It’s hard to be what you can’t see,” she said. “Women are still seriously under-represented in STEM leadership roles.

“The Superstars of STEM program sets out to smash stereotypes of what a scientist, technologist, engineer or mathematician look like – these powerful role models show girls that STEM is for them.

“Sustaining this type of program for the long-term is more important than ever amid the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic on women in the STEM workforce.”

Comments are closed.